Dream Houses

In the greenery

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Enlarged over the years, invaded by the garden, this house Giverny pushed in all directions

The workshop has retained its function as a workplace but has been integrated into the show

Built in the late nineteenth century, the 88 m2 salon-workshop, with 4 m under ceiling, extends the main room and offers a spacious volume with direct access to the garden. The glass roof, open in the roof and the north facade of the workshop, made with hammered glasses inserted in "T" irons, dates from the time when the painter James Finn had settled in the Giverny area to work on the traces of Monet and his friends. The clear walls, the view of the trees, the fluid space, the books, create a quiet atmosphere conducive to work. A few steps separate the office area from the workshop that follows the living room. Mona Braathen's paintings on the wall and easel

The house, an old farmhouse, was occupied by the American painter James Finn in the late nineteenth century. His studio enlarged the main room. In the 1990s, the architect Philippe Robert, author of the Museum of American Art Giverny, is seduced by the site and moved into the house. Little by little, he reviews the configuration of the places and transforms the habitat. A solid oak framework, erected on posts at 6 m, energizes the original facade and creates a suspended balcony open on the surrounding countryside. Below, an astonishing winter garden draws a circular canopy punctuated with moving panels. Finally, an extension on two levels, dressed in larch and glass, generates views of the garden. Like a plant, the animated house of games of shadow and light pushed in all directions!

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